Get Shouty


vote. be in it.
May 23, 2016, 6:14 pm
Filed under: Experience, Get Activist, Zeitgeist

have you copped this bloke on the telly?
interrupting me favourite show
talkin tax cut not favorin’ the many?
reminds me of someone I know
not that I’m against fiscal-ly fitness
don’t get me wrong on that score
I could watch all them rich blokes forever
explain no tax cuts to the poor
and I’m not against helping the many
cripes if they was to go on the blink
the rich’d have no earning interests
it certainly makes a bloke think
now it’s true throats get squeezed when they’re talking
not that they’ve done more so of late
and it’s true they’ve put aside Tone-on
but this close to voting it’s bait
so what if we can’t save the climate
so what if we can’t afford homes
I can remember what most of them look like
so there’ really no need have those
so when this bloke says Stong new economy
Economy he says on TV
I give him  nod and change channels
Cause I know he’s not talking to me

Enrol to vote – Australian Electoral Commission



Age of Entanglement and addressing Knotty Problems
March 24, 2016, 3:34 pm
Filed under: Innovation, Service Design | Tags:

  
This essay proposes a map for four domains of creative exploration—Science, Engineering, Design and Art—in an attempt to represent the antidisciplinary hypothesis: that knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within, disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled. 

It’s deliberately hard work to read, but asks cracking questions:

  • Can a scientist invent better solutions than an engineer?
  • Is an artist’s mindset really all that different from a scientist’s? 
  • Are they simply two ways of operating in the world that are complementary and intertwined? 

It’s chock full of  dense high nutrition nuggets:

  • an intriguing assertion by Savas Dimopoulos on the connection between Art and Science: “The things that are least important for our survival are the very things that make us human.” Both Art and Science can be understood as human needs to express the world around us. Both require suspension of disbelief, offering speculations about our physical and immaterial reality prior to proof.
  • The role of Science is to explain and predict the world around us; it ‘converts’ information into knowledge. The role of Engineering is to apply scientific knowledge to the development of solutions for empirical problems; it ‘converts’ knowledge into utility. The role of Design is to produce embodiments of solutions that maximize function and augment human experience; it ‘converts’ utility into behavior. The role of Art is to question human behavior and create awareness of the world around us; it ‘converts’ behavior into new perceptions of information
  • Science produces knowledge that is used by engineers. Engineering produces utility that is used by designers. Designers produce changes in behavior that are perceived by artists. Art produces new perceptions of the world, thereby granting access to new information in and about it, and inspiring new scientific inquiry. 

I love how this map is used to both understand and address Knotty Problems. 

MIT Media Lab Summit devoted a summit to Knotty Objects that gathered designers, scientists, engineers, makers, writers, curators, and scholars around the discussion of four complex and omnipresent objects, along with the rich stories they can tell. The objects–brick, bitcoin, steak, and phone–became lenses through which the transdisciplinary nature of contemporary design was examined.

A video archive of the entire summit is available here.

Happy chewing!



how to find things worth making
March 18, 2016, 3:49 pm
Filed under: Digital Strategy, Innovation, Service Design | Tags:


Lovely thinking about the role of research, the scaffolding of teams with structure and principles, the necessity of focussing on adding value and the whole shebang being an iterative process

Link here: https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/adamconnor/design-thinking-finding-problems-worth-solving-in-health
Lovely find @markpollard



success givers and the life we lead at work
March 17, 2016, 2:55 pm
Filed under: Experience, Get Friendly, The Rules, Zeitgeist | Tags: ,

  Wonderful interview with the organizational psychologist Adam Grant, who many know from his New York Times columns, describes three human orientations, of which we are all capable: the givers, the takers, and the matchers. These also influence whether organizations are joyful or toxic for human beings. His studies are dispelling a conventional wisdom that selfish takers are the most likely to succeed professionally. And, he is wise about practicing generosity in organizational life — what he calls making “microloans of our knowledge, our skills, our connections to other people” — in a way that is transformative for others, ourselves, and our places of work.

50 minutes well spent



Fireside stories
March 7, 2016, 5:29 pm
Filed under: Digital Strategy, Experience, Innovation, Service Design

  
Found this useful frame work on the Katie Dreke’s fab tumblr obsessivecompulsive 

  1. Start with conflict. Tolstoy once remarked, “All great literature is one of two stories; a man goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town”—and he knows a thing or two about narrative. Without a change in the status quo, there is no story, so make sure people understand the current situation and why it’s untenable.
  2. Explain your progress thus far. Your team may have been working on this problem for some time, but it will be new to your audience. Show the results from your customer research and competitive analysis; using quotes or images from real people for greater impact.
  3. Propose your grand ambition. Despite the challenges, reassure the audience that there’s reason to hope—and, in fact, a great opportunity for those willing to seize it. Lay out your team’s vision for the future, but then…
  4. Identify the barriers. Create drama by introducing new sources of conflict and explaining what’s stopping the organization from achieving its goals.
  5. Explain how to overcome those barriers. Make the audience the protagonists by explaining why their help is needed. If they feel like they are part of the solution, they will become powerful brand ambassadors for the new changes.
  6. Build excitement as you expose the creative solutions. Unveil your ideas and clearly illustrate how they will get you closer to the big vision.
  7. End smoothly with timing, costs, and next steps. Our last presentation tip now that the story is ending, is to take action. Translate the vision into tactical goals and clear responsibilities so that people can bring it to life.

Super. I’m a gonna use it now….

I was lucky enough to be in the audience at the Google Firestarters gig that Neil Perkin puts on all over the world. Great line up: Faris Yakob (founder Genius Steals), Angela Morris (Exec Planning Director, JWT Australia), Graeme Wood (Head of Strategy, M2M Australia) and a provocation about the intersection of data and creativity.

There was so much great stuff and interestingness. Effective too-it’s really got me thinking about where I think the sweet spots lie in the use of the digital discipline in the role of growing brands and business. 

1. Start with conflict. 

  • Is  digital storytelling content or experience?
  • Where paid media is experiencing 84% avoidance and banners have a 0.06% CTR and 1 in 5 ad block it’s easy to say that the problem lies in the audience- that fantasitc ‘attention span of a goldfish’ 8 second span thing
  • But we’re in a golden age of TV where long form content is king and people will watch an entire 13 hour series in one sitting
  • Gamer’s sessions average over an hour
  • Is it that audiences have less ability to focus, or that they’ve increased their ability to filter?
  • Digital is a more effective cultural medium than an advertising context
  • Our aim should be to get people off the couch
  • The opportunity is to think broader than media property, bigger than passive content consumption and to start to play in culture.

2. Explain progress thus far. 

  • Cultural institutions seem to be leading the way in utilising digital to mean more and grow
  • Museums and art galleries are exploring their reasons to be, to inspire and educate, and be Cathedrals of the Imagination 
  • Have a look at this great stuff: the work of the Culturelabel team, Seb Chan’s extraordinary Pen project for the Smithsonian,  MONA, what’s going on at music festivals….
  • Experiences are being designed to create new audiences, increase desire and attendance, increase dwell times, link the online data, content and curation with the physical world, build communities, and prompt repeat visitation 
  • This is happening as a result of working within the culture of audiences. Understanding their behaviour and seeking to provide experiences that add (not are ads)

3. Propose your grand ambition. 

  • Digital storytelling is creating a narrative in culture, driven by a protagonist on their own hero’s journey.

4. Identify the barriers. 

  • Paid Media magic beans=  easier to buy than build
  • I’ve got a hammer= the answer to everthing is paid media and all problems are solved with attention/engagement/ awareness
  • Over kill and undercooked= using creativity to only make advertising is kind of like using Nuclear Power to heat water to make electricity

5. Explain how to over come the barriers

  • Grown up business cases for innovation
  • Define ambitious outcomes beyond traditional media metrics 
  • Involve decision makers beyond marketing

6. Build excitement as you expose the creative solutions.

  • Working at the C level of an organisation and introducing all kinds of people to new ideas needs a skill set to manage complex stakeholder environments and the ability to both change people’s minds and help them build the skills to champion new ideas. Education is how you sell innovation

7. End smoothly with timing, costs, and next steps. 

  • Start now! Carve out a budget – what can 5% achieve? How about 25%? Write a plan.


      1. sublime
        February 26, 2016, 2:06 pm
        Filed under: Experience, Zeitgeist | Tags:

           

        It was Ansel Adams birthday this week. As a lover of stillness, ligh† and high places his photographs are potentially responsible for introducing the urban dwellers of the 20th Century to the truly sublime potential of National Parks. 

        Or maybe just this one. 

        This is the track down to the Fairy Bower in the Nattai Gorge, well out of range of data or voice, but still has the ability to connect you to things a little more powerful than your news feed.

        Anyhoo. Thanks Ansel. 

          



        the Inigo Montoya problem
        February 23, 2016, 4:37 pm
        Filed under: Get Activist, Innovation, Service Design | Tags:

          

        Well, good folk, there’s nothing on earth 

        Like a genuine, 

        Bona fide, 

        Billion dollar, 

        Ideas boom.

        Innovation!

        What’d I say? 

        Innovation!

        What’s it called? 

        Innovation!

        That’s right! Innovation!

        [crowd chants `Innovation’ softly and rhythmically] 

        I hear those things can make us proud 

        Don’t you build it in the cloud?

        What about us brain-dead slobs? 

        You’ll be given cushy jobs. 

        Were you sent here by the devil? 

        No, good sir, I’m on the level.  

        I swear it’s Australia’s only choice… 

        Throw up your hands and raise your voice! 

        All: Innovation!

        What’s it called? 

        All: Innovation!

        Once again… 

        All: Innovation!

        But your  pathway seems seems quite frail and broken… 

        Sorry, ma’am, the mob has spoken! 

        Innovation! Innovation! Innovation!

        [big finish] 

        Innovation!

        Homer:Inno… D’oh!




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