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Tsundoku
August 21, 2017, 11:01 am
Filed under: Great Stuff

Image result for book stack at home

Tsundoku is the condition of acquiring reading materials but letting them pile up in one’s home without reading them.

“Tsundoku” originated as Japanese slang (積ん読) “tsun-doku”. 「積ん読」 came from 「積んでおく」 “tsunde-oku” (to pile things up ready for later and leave) and 「読書」 “dokusho” (reading books). 「積んどく」 “tsundoku” is a euphonic change of 「積んでおく」. It is also used to refer to books ready for reading later when they are on a bookshelf. As currently written, the word combines the characters for “pile up” (積) and the character for “read” (読).

A. Edward Newton is quoted as saying: “Even when reading is impossible, the presence of books acquired produces such an ecstasy that the buying of more books than one can read is nothing less than the soul reaching towards infinity … we cherish books even if unread, their mere presence exudes comfort, their ready access reassurance.”

(thanks for the introduction  Neil Perkin)



Thoughts, ten, hooks, three
May 22, 2017, 6:46 pm
Filed under: The Rules

I got my evaluation
And on a scale of ten they gave me
For thoughts ten, hooks, three

Well, thoughts, ten, hooks, three
I make the team avoidant
Thinking for my own enjoyment

That ain’t it, kid, that ain’t it, kid

Thoughts, ten, hooks, three
It’s like to die!
Lost the defer and unlocked her
For my permission to ply

Wit and sass
Taught myself a fancy pair
Tightened up the random glare
Ditched the woes with it, all that goes with it

Wit and sass
Got the dingo-drongos won
Suddenly I’m getting national briefs
Wit and sass won’t get you jobs without beliefs

Didn’t cost a fortune neither
Didn’t hurt amex life either

Flat efficacy
I would get the strays and losers
Beggars really can’t be choosers
That ain’t it, kid, that ain’t it, kid

Fixed the assay
How do you do
Life turned into and endless medley
Of ‘Gee it had to be you’, why?

Wit and sass
Where the cupboard once was bare
Now you knock and someone’s there
You have got ’em, hey, stop the fought him, hey!

It’s a gas, just a dash of baritone
Shake your numerators and you’re fine
Wit and sass can change your life
They sure changed mine

You’re all looking at my wits now, aren’t you?

For wit and sass
Orchestra and audience
What they want is what you be
Keep the best of you, do the rest of you

Pits or class
I have never seen it fail
Confidant or a partner in- strife
Wit and sass, yes, wit and sass
Have changed my life



Interesting and effective
May 11, 2017, 10:50 am
Filed under: Digital Strategy

Lovely thoughts from Ben Armisted

I think that all planning about two things: it’s about being interesting and being effective.

  • I think we should try and be as interesting and effective in our research as we are in the rest of our jobs
  • By being interesting I mean to treat research as a creative act try and think as creatively and ambitiously about the research we do. We’re only to get to interesting answers if we ask interesting questions of ourselves and of people out in the world
  • When it comes to being effective to me that’s about motivation, it’s about understanding why we do research using it to inform judgment rather than to replace it
  • It also comes down to when. I think the best time to research is the old adage to research early, research late and never meddle in the middle
  • I think if you can have the right motivation, and you do research in the right moment, you’re more likely to have research and hopefully planning that is both more interesting and more effective.

A good series on advice to planners. There’s eleven in total and they’re only a couple of minutes each.



vote. be in it.
May 23, 2016, 6:14 pm
Filed under: Experience, Get Activist, Zeitgeist

have you copped this bloke on the telly?
interrupting me favourite show
talkin tax cut not favorin’ the many?
reminds me of someone I know
not that I’m against fiscal-ly fitness
don’t get me wrong on that score
I could watch all them rich blokes forever
explain no tax cuts to the poor
and I’m not against helping the many
cripes if they was to go on the blink
the rich’d have no earning interests
it certainly makes a bloke think
now it’s true throats get squeezed when they’re talking
not that they’ve done more so of late
and it’s true they’ve put aside Tone-on
but this close to voting it’s bait
so what if we can’t save the climate
so what if we can’t afford homes
I can remember what most of them look like
so there’ really no need have those
so when this bloke says Stong new economy
Economy he says on TV
I give him  nod and change channels
Cause I know he’s not talking to me

Enrol to vote – Australian Electoral Commission



Age of Entanglement and addressing Knotty Problems
March 24, 2016, 3:34 pm
Filed under: Innovation, Service Design | Tags:

  
This essay proposes a map for four domains of creative exploration—Science, Engineering, Design and Art—in an attempt to represent the antidisciplinary hypothesis: that knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within, disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled. 

It’s deliberately hard work to read, but asks cracking questions:

  • Can a scientist invent better solutions than an engineer?
  • Is an artist’s mindset really all that different from a scientist’s? 
  • Are they simply two ways of operating in the world that are complementary and intertwined? 

It’s chock full of  dense high nutrition nuggets:

  • an intriguing assertion by Savas Dimopoulos on the connection between Art and Science: “The things that are least important for our survival are the very things that make us human.” Both Art and Science can be understood as human needs to express the world around us. Both require suspension of disbelief, offering speculations about our physical and immaterial reality prior to proof.
  • The role of Science is to explain and predict the world around us; it ‘converts’ information into knowledge. The role of Engineering is to apply scientific knowledge to the development of solutions for empirical problems; it ‘converts’ knowledge into utility. The role of Design is to produce embodiments of solutions that maximize function and augment human experience; it ‘converts’ utility into behavior. The role of Art is to question human behavior and create awareness of the world around us; it ‘converts’ behavior into new perceptions of information
  • Science produces knowledge that is used by engineers. Engineering produces utility that is used by designers. Designers produce changes in behavior that are perceived by artists. Art produces new perceptions of the world, thereby granting access to new information in and about it, and inspiring new scientific inquiry. 

I love how this map is used to both understand and address Knotty Problems. 

MIT Media Lab Summit devoted a summit to Knotty Objects that gathered designers, scientists, engineers, makers, writers, curators, and scholars around the discussion of four complex and omnipresent objects, along with the rich stories they can tell. The objects–brick, bitcoin, steak, and phone–became lenses through which the transdisciplinary nature of contemporary design was examined.

A video archive of the entire summit is available here.

Happy chewing!



how to find things worth making
March 18, 2016, 3:49 pm
Filed under: Digital Strategy, Innovation, Service Design | Tags:


Lovely thinking about the role of research, the scaffolding of teams with structure and principles, the necessity of focussing on adding value and the whole shebang being an iterative process

Link here: https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/adamconnor/design-thinking-finding-problems-worth-solving-in-health
Lovely find @markpollard



success givers and the life we lead at work
March 17, 2016, 2:55 pm
Filed under: Experience, Get Friendly, The Rules, Zeitgeist | Tags: ,

  Wonderful interview with the organizational psychologist Adam Grant, who many know from his New York Times columns, describes three human orientations, of which we are all capable: the givers, the takers, and the matchers. These also influence whether organizations are joyful or toxic for human beings. His studies are dispelling a conventional wisdom that selfish takers are the most likely to succeed professionally. And, he is wise about practicing generosity in organizational life — what he calls making “microloans of our knowledge, our skills, our connections to other people” — in a way that is transformative for others, ourselves, and our places of work.

50 minutes well spent