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Age of Entanglement and addressing Knotty Problems
March 24, 2016, 3:34 pm
Filed under: Innovation, Service Design | Tags:

  
This essay proposes a map for four domains of creative exploration—Science, Engineering, Design and Art—in an attempt to represent the antidisciplinary hypothesis: that knowledge can no longer be ascribed to, or produced within, disciplinary boundaries, but is entirely entangled. 

It’s deliberately hard work to read, but asks cracking questions:

  • Can a scientist invent better solutions than an engineer?
  • Is an artist’s mindset really all that different from a scientist’s? 
  • Are they simply two ways of operating in the world that are complementary and intertwined? 

It’s chock full of  dense high nutrition nuggets:

  • an intriguing assertion by Savas Dimopoulos on the connection between Art and Science: “The things that are least important for our survival are the very things that make us human.” Both Art and Science can be understood as human needs to express the world around us. Both require suspension of disbelief, offering speculations about our physical and immaterial reality prior to proof.
  • The role of Science is to explain and predict the world around us; it ‘converts’ information into knowledge. The role of Engineering is to apply scientific knowledge to the development of solutions for empirical problems; it ‘converts’ knowledge into utility. The role of Design is to produce embodiments of solutions that maximize function and augment human experience; it ‘converts’ utility into behavior. The role of Art is to question human behavior and create awareness of the world around us; it ‘converts’ behavior into new perceptions of information
  • Science produces knowledge that is used by engineers. Engineering produces utility that is used by designers. Designers produce changes in behavior that are perceived by artists. Art produces new perceptions of the world, thereby granting access to new information in and about it, and inspiring new scientific inquiry. 

I love how this map is used to both understand and address Knotty Problems. 

MIT Media Lab Summit devoted a summit to Knotty Objects that gathered designers, scientists, engineers, makers, writers, curators, and scholars around the discussion of four complex and omnipresent objects, along with the rich stories they can tell. The objects–brick, bitcoin, steak, and phone–became lenses through which the transdisciplinary nature of contemporary design was examined.

A video archive of the entire summit is available here.

Happy chewing!



how to find things worth making
March 18, 2016, 3:49 pm
Filed under: Digital Strategy, Innovation, Service Design | Tags:


Lovely thinking about the role of research, the scaffolding of teams with structure and principles, the necessity of focussing on adding value and the whole shebang being an iterative process

Link here: https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/adamconnor/design-thinking-finding-problems-worth-solving-in-health
Lovely find @markpollard



the Inigo Montoya problem
February 23, 2016, 4:37 pm
Filed under: Get Activist, Innovation, Service Design | Tags:

  

Well, good folk, there’s nothing on earth 

Like a genuine, 

Bona fide, 

Billion dollar, 

Ideas boom.

Innovation!

What’d I say? 

Innovation!

What’s it called? 

Innovation!

That’s right! Innovation!

[crowd chants `Innovation’ softly and rhythmically] 

I hear those things can make us proud 

Don’t you build it in the cloud?

What about us brain-dead slobs? 

You’ll be given cushy jobs. 

Were you sent here by the devil? 

No, good sir, I’m on the level.  

I swear it’s Australia’s only choice… 

Throw up your hands and raise your voice! 

All: Innovation!

What’s it called? 

All: Innovation!

Once again… 

All: Innovation!

But your  pathway seems seems quite frail and broken… 

Sorry, ma’am, the mob has spoken! 

Innovation! Innovation! Innovation!

[big finish] 

Innovation!

Homer:Inno… D’oh!